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Showing posts from August, 2010

The "Steampunk" Victorian Wedding Dress

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When Emily Kitchin married Mr Arthur Turner Waite in September 1878, she wore this dress. They took their vows at St Mary’s Church, Scarborough. The dress is cream satin; a very expensive bridal gown.

The fitted bodice has no buttons at the back. There are long princess seams, a tailoring technique just introduced by Charles Frederick Worth.



And that's all I know.

The rest of this post? Guesswork.

It must fasten at the front, like a coat. And it's not one dress, but two.

Most of what you see is the satin over-dress, but those ruffles and pleats are another garment entirely, an under-dress.

Two layers gloriously entwined in a notched hem. Like a cog wheel, this is the detail to note: are we looking at a Victorian bridal gown here, or a steampunk costume?



Repeated on every edge and in miniature at the cuffs, these notches reveal the accordion pleats and lacy cuffs beneath. It’s not clear if the cream-over-coffee tones are by design, or the effect of time. Either way, I love i…

The Coloured Glass Tram Shelter Adverts

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Ruby red, sapphire blue, onyx black; the jewelled tones of these early 20th century glass adverts caught my eye from at least 20 paces. But then I stood close and read the copy. Wonderful stuff.

Have a read yourself, but don't forget to do so in a cut-glass English accent.

Salvaged from trams and tram shelters in the North East of England, these adverts are my most literal 'vintage copywriting' post so far.



ALWAYS GOOD.

You can't top that, can you? And the vibrant blue glass. Sigh.



THIS FACT all MOTHERS OUGHT TO KNOW
BOLSOVER'S FOOD makes BABIES GROW

St Anne's Road, Rotherham.

Is J T Bolsover still there now?

 J NEVILLE 
The FIRST CLASS Outfitter 
FOR BOOTS, DRAPERY, HOSIERY ETC

I wonder how much these cost to make? And looks like they were on display for many years.


FOR WANT OF REST YOUR CHILD MIGHT DIE
SO GET NURSE WALKER'S "HUSH-A-BY"

Blimey.

Invitation to Comment

I think these adverts are beautiful. They're social history and art. I would have th…